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20121010
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of americans. that is the bush and 55 for 47 days is noted the president-elect would be. we had court cases, demonstrations, charges back-and-forth that make even the mud whistling and cable television to the lipton. it was a mess. in the and the supreme court had to intervene. and don't agree it was a 5-4 vote. floridian was miscounting. it was a bow to have. americans never thought an election as legitimate. and then flush presidency and the bad feelings that have come from an. monitoring the election. if there are any irregularities, business, front you can bet that this would go to court. we can only a few thousand votes away from john kerry challenging him on election results, and the could have watched the same process. the dean of american global scientists as we of the sloppy a selection systems of any industrialized democracy. that was true then minister now. we still have time to take remedial steps will the election to minimize the sloppiness, incompetents, and from. from has distorted history in american life. it just like to be decent and animals college students. and live in n
politics happens the morning after the morning after. so, i think -- hearing talking about the election. i don't know how the election is going to come up and make no predictions but i do ask myself if romney gets smashed i don't think the political problem is we have a center left problem and we have a far right party that is a structural problem. the republican party has gone nuts in my view. they've been at war -- there's been a simultaneous -- they've been simultaneously at war with physics at the same time. on the deficit and biological l2 mac, some of them for sure. so the question to me is what happens the morning after this election if romney loses. he wasn't far right enough. i wonder if the morning after the morning after. people would say we have gone too far to the right and we need a different republican party which i think the country desperately needs because it needs to be center-left and it's the only way we agree to get big compromises on these issues. >> can i add the role of history suggests the clinton and ronald reagan the second term as the productive term, the big a
come back and you know, fred's points are well taken which is for a lot of voters, the election started last night. if he is going to have a come back in ohio, it started last night. >> and fred and then we are going to open it up for the rest of you folks -- president obama one last time and beat senator mccain by seven points. now, part of it was you know, 66% of the vote among 18 to 29-year-olds, 67% of the vote among latino voters. african-american was like 95-4 or something like that and the poll has shown the african-american vote is rocksolid for the president and the numbers extremely high so lets let's just sort of assume rough parity with last time. but the question was, as you suggested the turnout levels among latino voters and i would add young voters very much questionable and when i have gone on campuses i cannot find a pulse. you saw a registration table registered to voters. there might be a couple of people behind the table to register people and nobody in front of the table registering. there's there is just no pulse there. is it safe to say that a seven-point
that separation? another question that's obvious to raise, especially with an election coming up, is in this any way to cover an election? it's a really good question, and i'm sure the session will spark good conversations, and i hope it will give us some good ideas as well. this looks like a fascinating program, and we're very, very proud to host it. thank you very much and welcome. [applause] >> thank you very much. and now i'd like to hand the floor over to jim corpsville of stony brook university who will lead our plenary panel asking, is this any way to cover an election? >> thank you, a.j., and good morning to everybody. we have a very distinguished and knowledgeable panel to talk about this topic, the timing, obviously, couldn't be better, debates wednesday night. let me introduce the people on the panel. to my immediate right is michael howe who's the technical cofounder of the fourth of state project as well as the architect of the platform that runs both enterprises. the project focuses on driving media coverage of the election 2012. and i think he'll have a very interesting powerpoint
romney had in mind when he wanted to say states have rights. what about the city's rights to elect their own elected officials? and help do they own? when you say government interference, i understand you were talking about the federal government, but i heard mitt romney say that states' rights, is it the rights of the state's coming into the cities to overthrow the local municipalities? if that's a big government, small government, i don't know, is it controlled government? i think they have a right to control their own destiny in their own city. so the public is on the ballot in november, and i am turning everybody in michigan to vote down. we don't need dictatorship. it is a dictated view. >> host: thanks so much on the mall of the government in relation to the city and its relationship with federal government. and detroit. swb writes the government should do its job and maintain the general welfare. from debate news the numbers are in on how many people watched on television. more than 600 million watched the debate in this election cycle nearly 15 million were going to watch t
adjustment in that. so i mean, i hope that the outcome of this process, once the elections are over are linked more to the financial structures into any other constitutional issues. >> but how will that complicates spain's relationship with the rest of europe and particularly economic support from the rest of europe? >> i don't think that at this point in time there are any advances being challenged yet so i don't see any and for this relationship to be changed under circumstances. i don't see any reason for your tv can earn. i mean, it has not areolas.com. >> question appear. >> hi, nancy donaldson with the ils. i am curious about what you would say about the youth unemployment situation in spain and what is the role of the private sector in helping to tackle these issues and especially companies like yours and others in a better position than done. >> i'll start with the last part of your question. a number of persons that could work in the bank, and also our young people to be employed in companies with the assistance, so we have a part of this effort in order to address this iss
for the president's re-election effort is simply one word, forward. but not everyone thought it was catchy enough. so the vice president has apparently been floating some alternatives. >> age change only comes through challenge. i'm more optimistic about this country than i ever have been. not because of baraken. he can't do it. forget about your [bleep]. forget about all of it. so why the hell don't you go home. i don't quite get this. i'm so ashamed. [laughter] >> vice president biden was fired up at the naacp speech today. his second stem winder in a week. obama supporters praised those speeches. now it appears one show uncovered a new tour biden's starting. >> this summer, don't miss your chance to see america's funniest number two. joe biden, vp of comedy. >> those walls are often thin. i wonder how the hell my parents did it. that is different story. >> every laugh. >> barak says, three-letter word, j, o, b, s, jobs. >> every gaffe. >> god rest her soul and, although she is, your mom is still alive. it was your dad passed. god bless her soul. >> the joe biden vp of comedy tour. it will have
facing a third party candidate in the 2012 election. then live coverage from denver, colorado, for a campaign rally with republican presidential candidate mitt romney. later, president obama rallies with supporters in las vegas. >> tuesday british labour party leader ed miliband delivers remarks in manchester. we'll have live coverage from england here on c-span2 starting at 9:15 a.m. eastern. also tuesday on c-span2, a look at what happens to individual taxes if the bush era tax cuts expire. former congressional budget office director douglas holtz-eakin and other economists look at the issue. our live coverage from the urban institute here in washington, d.c. starts at noon eastern. >> every generation through our history has worked and sacrificed to leave a better country to their children and grandchildren and future generations. we, we were then spending their money, we are now even more, much more, spending their money, and we are leaving them a mess that will be a very difficult to deal with, and if we are that weak, just think of who wants to come here first and take u
and election campaigns? >> the major effort has been going on for some time to come in various ways, to force business to back away from participating in both the election process and the process of governance. which loses sight of the fact that the constitution fundamentally guarantees us the right to petition the government, and the supreme court continues to support that right. and why do people want us not to do it? because for years, you know, people in business were reticent to, and then we started getting organized and now are all saying wait a minute, we didn't invite him to this party. we like our deal where we just make our arrangements and when our elections. well, good luck. it ain't happening. and american businesses are beginning to see that if they don't play any game, somebody else is going to steal their lunch. >> and that's a good think it is a good thing that american businesses are getting involved. i said earlier we do not have a clinical action committee at the nam but we are forming one. we had a debate for 40 years, and manufactures are very concerned about the future
terms rather than putting faith in an elected official and crossing our fingers and hoping to do what we want. specifically for a contemporary example, the students into bed or on strikes for months because there was a proposed tuition hike that they said was completely unacceptable. it tried to make practice illegal. what has come of this? the tuition hike did not go through and the law forbidding process was repealed. i think -- >> would you please ask a specific question. >> i know. my question, i suppose, would be what do you see is the value of social movements for political change. >> thank you. >> thank you very much for that example. i think hopefully folks realize that actually the reason i was asked to testify before rumors of congress was because of my work on such a social movement. there were students on our campus who organized collectively to address this concern with our insurance and who saw that georgetown was providing an subsidizing contraception on insurance for their employees but not for students, even as students were paying entirely for their own insurance. and s
in the election of 1956. ben hogan for president. if we are going to have a golfer, let's have a good one. [laughter] eisenhower was franklin roosevelt's first choice to command the d-day invasion. eisenhower had three amphibious landings under his belt at that time. he got along well with the british and was churchill. that was very important and professor roosevelt there was no question he was going to pick eisenhower although he gave general marshal the opportunity to accept -- text to command the invasion if he wanted and eisenhower was characteristic, self disciplined, refused to express an opinion and president roosevelt selected ike. no one else could develop the western armies together as he could and his decision to land on d-day in spite of the weather caught the germans totally by surprise. they had no idea that innovation was coming. can you imagine 5000 ships in the english channel and the germans not knowing it because of the weather? that happened. the decision to want to take pairs with ike's decision, to take paris was his decision as well. they were to bypass pairs and c
campaign seemed to have slid into a fully attained, which we see each and every election season, which is your upper train your opponent in ways that voters have heard time and time again. the republican, senator kyrillos, you are portrayed as friend of the rich, someone will make middle-class pay more because the rich shouldn't have any sort of implications of their taxes changed. senator menendez, you will portrayed be a tax-and-spend liberal. let's move beyond clichÉs right now. tell me specifically, what one thing about your opponent makes him less qualified than you to serve in the u.s. senate. senator kyrillos, you can go first. kyrillos: well, senator menendez mentions the middle-class. he mentioned it tonight, does it fairly often. but up, the middle-class is not doing very well at all. we've got to do better. and so, you know, i read the press releases that you put out and i've heard your opening statement, but i don't hear any action items about how we are going to do it better. and so, i've got a plan. i know that if we do what we've been doing, more of the same, well, we w
or became. um, the big issue, the big change began in 1980, of course, with the election of ronald reagan because ronald reagan brought with him to washington, um, a very underrated figure in recent american history, someone who i don't think gets his due as an important person, and that's edwin meese. because edwin meese at first as an adviser and then as attorney general said, look, there has been a liberal ayen da at the supreme court -- agenda at the supreme court, there needs to be a conservative agenda at the supreme court. what was that agenda? expand executive power, end racial preferences intended to assist african-americans, speed up execution, welcome religion into the public sphere and, above all, um, reverse roe v. wade and allow states once again to ban abortion. a big part of the reagan revolution, um, was the arrival in washington of a group of young and committed conservative lawyers who wanted to work in that, on behalf of that agenda. who were two of the best and brightest of that group? john roberts and samuel alito. 197 finish -- in 1985 in a memo plotting litigation
won't say yeah, we are right even in the best political climate after an election everyone is trying to be nice they can't make progress at the policy is so toxic they are not going to do with the problem. still downgrade. as we have to move past 2013 no matter what. you don't need causing the recession a threat to force us to move. in fact it is irresponsible to have the recession so we should get past the fiscal cliff, extend the ceiling and get to the fundamentals in this grand bargain that will for ever get rid of the fiscal cliff and have a tax code and get rid of the sequestered because we know what the plan will be and that is the best way to go. >> so, the way we got here to the fiscal cliff is a bunch of the cans kept getting kicked down the road and happened to land right in front of us now at the end of december. if you look at cbo office of the fiscal plan if you notice the scary part is the pile of cans that happen to be in front of us right now. there's a good part of the cliff though and that is the part that stretches on throughout the rest of the ten year budget wind
willingly lose an election if i could solve these problems. it is that serious. tim geithner, the treasury secretary, in the book is quoted thousands of words telling the president, you have got to do something about this problem. we have to fix it. you literally, it's not that we're going to close down the government, we will close down the american economy and, in turn, the global economy. if they do not solve the issue of this runaway spending, get some way to stop borrowing in excess, he tells the president of the united states if we default on this, on our obligations and our ious, we will trigger a depression worse than the 1930s. anybody here remember the 19 1930s depression? you probably don't. i don't. i was not born, but i've read about it. it was a calamity for the world. tim geithner said to the president what, if we default on this, if we do not solve this problem, we will have an economic catastrophe that will make the 2008 financial crisis a footnote in the history books. anyone remember the 2008 financial crisis? that's coming not from some columnist or journalist, that is
. and an incredible, beautiful environment and also in an interesting election season to say the least. our first award for the evening -- before we get to that, i have to start it was a joke. can i start out with a joke? joe biden. sorry, that's the joke. [applause] followed by another joke, nancy pelosi. sorry. as an ardent practicing catholic. sorry. i was told by friends of "saturday night live" but i do the best nancy pelosi impersonation, but i'm still waiting for that bet they are going to me and "saturday night live." he seemed to avoid goofy liberal spirits on the republicans they do over there. our first award to the evening is the obama got some award. i can't believe i'm actually saying that. troubling. for about 25 years come in the media research center has been documenting every idiocy we know from the media as they celebrate one liberal hero after another. and let me just say, the people we are going to be talking about, they love politicians who want to raise your taxes, right? they love politicians who want to expand the nanny state and are going to check all the boxes here. the
be governed through the most austere totalitarian means and once that collapsed the we have an elected government in tripoli it cannot project power beyond greater tripoli. you have a problem of governmental incapacity in libya that cannot deal with the crisis. egypt is different. egypt you have a country that has been an age old cluster of civilization for years. a cohesive community along the nile aware the government has greater bureaucratic and institutional power even under this new tenuis regime than the government in libya. the government in egypt has an army and police forces but the problem is political. can an islamic government take action against islamic them craters demonstrators. >> to take the other issue you are talking about this week, iran is a big theme in your book. you talk in one chapter about the iranian pet. the prime minister of israel sees iran very much in terms of the munich analogy. iran heading for having nuclear weapons capability that could threaten the existence of israel so the policy conclusions from that, you have a broader geographical and historica
person. someone who never sought elected officings and so he didn't do a whole lot to promote himself, although he lived a long life into the late 1800s, 1894 he died, but he retreated in the last 20 years of life into pretty much a private world and didn't promote himself. i also think that soon after the war was over, very soon after the war was over, much of the nation was guided by or inspired by a desire for reconciliation among whites, too bad for anybody else, and holt did not represent that point of view. he was very distressed at the repeated way the nation was unifieded and the former slaves' welfare was banded, and so he was a contrarian, and, again, didn't have a place in that narrative that was being created after the war, or a place for being celebrated in the way that the narrative was being developed after the war so he retreated, and he -- he was bitter, actually, at the end, but he sort of retreated to his private world, and he tried to reconstruct some relationships with family members, descendants of his own generation, nephew and niece in particular, and he clung
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18